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Sioux Falls Feminists endorse Bully for showing that brutal bullies
are common place in American grade, middle and high schools
and it's high time school officials did something about it.

Bully
It's Time To Take a Stand

Bully (2013) - 98 minutes
Bully at Amazon.com

From Sundance Award-winning filmmaker, Lee Hirsch, comes a beautifully cinematic, character-driven documentary following five kids and families over the course of a school year. Offering insight into different facets of America's bullying crisis, the stories include two families who have lost children to suicide and a mother awaiting the fate of her 14-year-old daughter, who has been incarcerated after bringing a gun on her school bus. With an intimate and often shocking glimpse into homes, classrooms, cafeterias and principals' offices, this is a powerful and inspiring film that every educator, parent and teenager should see.

11-15-17 How social stress makes your brain vulnerable to depression
How bullying can lead to depression. EXPERIENCES like bullying make the blood-brain barrier leaky, leading to brain inflammation and leaving you vulnerable to depression, according to studies of human brains and mice. Anything that threatens your sense of worth is a type of social stress – be it bullying, body-image issues, social anxiety or extreme shyness. To see how such stresses affect mood, Scott Russo of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, and his team exposed 24 small, subordinate mice to larger, dominant mice for 10 minutes every day, for 10 days. Ten of the mice coped well, but 14 became socially withdrawn and more timid. Comparing blood, DNA and tissue samples from the small mice and control mice suggests that social stress changes mood in three stages. First, the stress kicks off inflammation in the bloodstream. This weakens the blood-brain barrier, which normally protects the brain, making it more likely to let substances in. This enables large molecules like inflammatory substance interleukin-6 and aggressive white blood cells called monocytes to pass into the brain. Here they seem to disrupt signalling in the nucleus accumbens, which helps evaluate threats and rewards. This is the first study to link social stress to blood-brain barrier dysfunction and depression-related behaviour, says Russo. In stressed mice, up to 30 per cent of vessels lining the blood-brain barrier showed signs of breaches in the nucleus accumbens. This seems to be caused by changes in gene activity – in stressed mice, genes in this brain area produced 40 per cent less of a protein called claudin-5, which usually secures the integrity of the blood-brain barrier.

7-7-17 Even toddlers expect bullies to get more than their fair share
Even toddlers expect bullies to get more than their fair share
For the first time, there’s evidence that even 17-month-old infants expect socially dominant people to be treated differently in life, and to get more things. Even babies seem to expect bullies to get more in life. For the first time, there’s evidence that infants expect socially dominant people to be treated differently. From as young as 6 months, babies begin to judge other people’s characters, and by the age of 10 months, infants anticipate that bigger things will dominate smaller ones. Now an experiment has found that 17-month-old infants expect dominant people to have more toys and other resources. Previous studies have found that, in the absence of any social differences, infants expect objects to be equally shared out between people. This was discovered by playing videos of Lego pieces being shared between two people, and seeing how long a toddler looked at variations from a fair procedure – a sign of surprise. Other studies involving sharing crackers or milk had similar findings. Now a team has discovered that 17-month-old toddlers follow social cues to adjust their expectations of what a person should have. “They are tuned to what they observe – who is more powerful or competent – and use that to make further predictions,” says team member Hyo Gweon at Stanford University in California. (Webmaster's comment: Like I've said the near human-extinction event 73,000 years-ago resulted in the survival of the strongest, most intelligent and most brutal strain of humans.)

8-23-16 Why bullying is such a successful evolutionary strategy
Why bullying is such a successful evolutionary strategy
It is not just people that bully the vulnerable. Many animals do it too, and in evolutionary terms it may even work. Frodo ruled with an iron fist. He incited fear among his fellow group members. His "demonic streak", as it was later called, started early. From three years old he was throwing rocks at those around him. Frodo, a large-bodied chimpanzee with a recognisable grey streak, would later become the alpha male of his group in Tanzania's Gombe Stream National Park. The primatologist Jane Goodall called him a "real bully". She had even predicted his rise back in 1979, writing: "In about twenty years one of these two brothers probably will become the alpha." All the other chimps feared Frodo, which helped his rise to the top. He even pushed himself on his own mother, and fathered a sickly infant with her, who would not survive for long. "He was aggressive towards all of the other chimps," says anthropologist Michael Wilson of the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, who first met Frodo in 2001. "A lot of the other males had a bare patch of fur on their lower back side from where Frodo would bite them." Many other primates show similar behaviour to Frodo's. His actions hint at something rather dark about our shared ancestry with chimpanzees. They suggest that bullying your way to the top has a long history, and may even be innate. (Webmaster's comment: There is no excuse for humans bullying even if it is built-in. We have this very large conscious brain and we are fully able to make a conscious decision not to bully. We do not have to be brutes!)

4-15-16 France Creteil: Girls 'tortured 12-year-old' in bullying case
France Creteil: Girls 'tortured 12-year-old' in bullying case
French police are questioning three schoolgirls in a Paris suburb suspected of torturing a younger girl, in a bullying ordeal that lasted months. The victim's father told Europe 1 radio the attackers had stubbed out cigarettes on the 12-year-old's face and arms, dislocated her jaw, slashed her with a knife and urinated on her. The gang in Creteil extorted money from her and tortured her after she had gone to steal from a grocer's, it is alleged.

Week of Aug 1st-7th. Canadian researchers found that high school-age bullies had higher self-esteem, greater social rank, and lower rates of depression than other students, indicating that bullying works. They also get more sex. (Webmaster's comment: As a survival and breeding strategy it makes sense that they do. The top brutes feel great and many women see them as the best breeding choices. But when it comes to having a civilized society they are a complete failure, and tolerating them leads to the abuse and violence that's running out of control in America.)

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Bully
It's Time To Take a Stand

Sioux Falls Feminists endorse Bully for showing that brutal bullies
are common place in American grade, middle and high schools
and it's high time school officials did something about it.