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2 Women's Sexuality News Articles
from 2021
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1-24-21 JoJo Siwa: YouTube star 'never been this happy' after coming out
YouTube star JoJo Siwa has told fans she has never been so happy before after coming out on social media. In a post on Twitter, the teenager shared a photo of herself wearing a T-Shirt with the words 'Best. Gay. Cousin. Ever.' printed on it. She later told fans she was not ready to put a label on her sexuality, but that coming out felt "awesome". Celebrities including Paris Hilton and Ellen DeGeneres supported the 17-year-old on social media. Siwa first found fame on the reality show Dance Moms, which documented the tantrums and triumphs of a group of pre-teen dancers in Pennsylvania. The American dancer, singer and YouTuber - known for her massive colourful hair bows - now has millions of followers. Her tweet on Friday was liked more than one million times. On Saturday, she said in an Instagram Live post that she had "never ever been this happy". Responding to a fan who asked what "label" she was, she said: "I don't really know this answer. I think humans are awesome. I think humans are really incredible people." "Right now, I'm super duper happy and I want to share everything with the world, I really do, but I also want to keep things in my life private until they are ready to be public," she added.While acknowledging that everyone's experience is different, Siwa said that coming out "has this stigma around it - that it's a really, really, really scary thing, but it's not anymore". Siwa also said she had "always believed that my person was going to be my person and if that person happened to be a boy great and if that person happened to be a girl great."

1-17-21 Are women let down by period trackers?
When journalist Orla Barry received a notification from her iPhone informing her that her period was due "any day in the next three weeks", she shared it on social media with wry amusement. It wasn't the first time she'd received such an unspecific notification from the app, and it prompted others to share their stories. "I got one which said my period was 56 days late," wrote one. "My notification said 'the next nine days'," said another. One man said his smartwatch had a menstruation tracker activated by default when he got it, and it kept telling him his period was "due" - despite him never having had one. These apps do face a big challenge - periods are not always renowned for their punctuality. But are they up to the job? At their most simple, women input the dates when their periods begin and end, and an app calculates when their next is due to arrive based on this information. It can also use this data to estimate when they might ovulate: this is also when they are most likely to conceive. Some offer to track additional data including basal body temperature, sleep patterns, menstrual pain and sexual activity, which can provide further clues - although there have been concerns around what else this data can be used for by the developers of the app. However, women's cycles can change from month to month based on a large number of factors including stress, age, and hormone fluctuations. It is perhaps not all that surprising that a scientific study of nearly 1,000 women carried out in 2018 found that the apps they were using were only correctly identifying when they ovulated 21% of the time. But period trackers remain very popular. They are used for a number of reasons.


2 Women's Sexuality News Articles
from 2021

Women's Sexuality News Articles from 2020